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Periodontal Disease and Pregnancy

Researchers have shown that periodontal disease in expectant mothers actually exposes their unborn child to many different risks; particularly if they also happen to be diabetes sufferers.

Periodontal disease generally begins with a bacterial infection in the gum (gingival) tissue, which progressively destroys the tissue and the underlying bone.  If left untreated, the bacterial infection causes an inflammatory reaction in the body, which can significantly deepen the gum pockets (space between the teeth and gums) and forces the gum and jawbone to recede.  Eventually, the progressive nature of periodontal disease causes the teeth to become loose and unstable, and eventually fall out.

Pregnancy causes many hormonal changes which increase the risk of the expectant mother to develop gingivitis (inflammation of the gum tissue) and periodontal disease.  These oral problems have been linked in many research studies to preeclampsia, low birth weight of the baby and premature birth.  Expectant women should seek immediate treatment for periodontal disease in order to reduce the risk of pre-natal and post-natal complications.

Reasons for the Connection

There are many different reasons why periodontal disease may affect the health of the mother and her unborn child:

  • Prostaglandin – Periodontal disease appears to elevate levels of prostaglandin in mothers who are suffering from the more advanced forms of the condition.  Prostaglandin is a labor-inducing compound found in one of the oral bacteria strains associated with periodontitis.  Elevated levels of prostaglandin can cause the mother to give birth prematurely and deliver a baby with a low birth weight.

  • C - reactive protein (CRP) – This protein, which has been previously linked to heart disease, has now been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes including preeclampsia and premature birth.  Periodontal infections elevate C-reactive protein levels and amplify the body’s natural inflammatory response.  Periodontal bacteria may enter the bloodstream causing the liver to produce CRP which leads to inflamed arteries as well as possible blood clots.  These inflammatory effects can then lead to blocked arteries causing strokes or heart attacks.

  • Bacteria spread – The bacteria which colonize in the gum pockets can readily travel through the bloodstream and affect other parts of the body.  In pregnant women, research has found that oral bacteria and associated pathogens have colonized in the internal mammary glands and coronary arteries.

Diagnosis and Treatment

There are many safe, non surgical treatment options available for pregnant women.  It is of paramount importance to halt the progress of periodontal disease in order to increase the chances of a safe and healthy delivery.

Initially, the dentist will assess the exact condition of the gums and jawbone in order to make a precise diagnosis.  Scaling and root planing are two common non-surgical procedures used to rid the tooth-root surfaces of calculus (tartar) and remove the bacterial toxins from the gum pockets.

The advantages to the pregnant woman are plentiful.  The risks of pregnancy complications caused by periodontal disease are reduced by as much as 50%, and these treatments will alleviate many unpleasant and harmful effects associated with gingivitis and periodontal infection.

Dentists can provide dental education and recommendations to the pregnant women on effective home care which can reduce risks that may affect her and/or her child’s health.  Risks of periodontal disease can be vastly reduced by proper home care, smoking cessation, dietary changes and the ingestion of supplementary vitamins.

If you have any questions or concerns about periodontal disease and its affect on pregnancy, please ask your dentist.

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Testimonials

I am 42 years old. All of my life I was self conscious about my smile
because of the dark tetracycline stain on my teeth. When I was 37 I
decided to do something about it. I had braces for four years to prepare
me for orthognathic surgery. My maxillofacial surgeon moved my jaw
forward so my overbite would be corrected. After that healed, the braces
came off and I went to see Dr. Stewart. She said I was a perfect
candidate for porcelain veneers. After talking with her and seeing her
portfolio, she installed them.

Almost over night I went from not smiling at all to grinning like a
fool. I can tell you the exact moment I knew I had made the right
decision to do what I had done. About a month after Dr. Stewart had
finished with me, a complete stranger said, "You have a nice smile." It
was the first time in my life I had ever heard those words...ever. My
limited vocabulary prevents me from describing what those words meant to
me but my whole world was changed.

I am 42 years old and I have a nice smile. Would I do it all again?
Absolutely! Do I have any regrets? Absolutely not!

Thanks Dr. Stewart!


Stephen...with a PH!

"Whenever people complain about their dentist or say they haven't been for a checkup in years, I tell them about Dr. Nancy Stewart and her great team. They're all friendly and professional, and the work they do is top-notch. For the past nine years, they have done both 'yearly maintenance' and cosmetic procedures on my teeth, and I get regular compliments on my smile! Leave your excuses at home and go see Dr. Nancy."

Kate Y. February 2007

"Dr. Stewart may be the only dentist I have never been afraid to go to.
Everyone on her staff is informative, friendly and professional, and so is
she. Check out the photo board on your way out, too - she's the only dentist
I've ever met who gets flossing photos from her patients' vacations!"

J. Handler

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